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Now, the world can understand what a woman goes through during menopause. Find out how

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Have you ever wondered what it’s like for a woman to go through menopause? A male can hardly imagine the agony when this happens. But not any longer, thanks to the development of a new vest that stimulates menopause hot flushes.

In other words, this pad depicts one of the most common and unpleasant menopausal symptoms. Yes, we’re not joking. Some male members of parliament (MPs) recently tried it, and their reactions were life-changing. Some lawmakers described it as “volcanic” and “very uncomfortable.” All of this occurred on Tuesday at an event held at Portcullis House in Westminster to raise awareness about the acute shortages of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) products in the UK.

Stephen Kinnock, Wes Streeting, Nick Thomas-Symonds, Tim Loughton, and Allan Dorans were among the politicians who wore the vest with heated pads.

“It’s deeply unpleasant and an enveloping heat,” Streeting said after trying on the vest. I’m not sure how you’d go about your life. “I can’t wait to get rid of this.”

Kinnock described it as “a very intense kind of heat and an internal feeling, almost volcanic inside, not like being warmed by the sun.”

“I’m feeling this on my back now. Imagine making a speech in the House of Commons and suddenly getting a hot flush. If [men] had this, we’d be complaining a lot,” said former Conservative party leader Iain Duncan Smith, after putting the vest on.

“If you pass out, we’ve got water. Welcome to my world. I don’t need the vest to be hot and bothered,” said MP Carolyn Harris.

What is this vest, actually?

This special vest, created by the band ‘Over the Bloody Moon,’ features electric pads that simulate the heat that women experience during menopause.

“Hot flushes are one of the top three symptoms affecting menopausal women’s lives, disrupting sleep, increasing anxiety, and frequently affecting women’s performance at work.” “For those who haven’t felt it, it’s easy to underestimate its intensity and fail to recognize just how much of an impact it has on daily life,” said Lesley Salem, founder of Over the Bloody Moon.

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