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Rare mummified baby woolly mammoth, frozen over 30,000 years ago, found by Canadian gold miners

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Canadian gold miners have found the remains of a rare mummified baby woolly mammoth that froze over 30,000 years ago in the Klondike gold fields.

According to a news release from the Yukon government and Tr’ondek Hwech’in First Nation, miners were working on the Eureka Creek when they made the discovery.

The mammoth calf, which is the most complete mummified mammoth found in North America, has been named Nun cho ga by the Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin Elders.

Nun cho ga, which means “big baby animal” in the Hän language, likely roamed the Yukon with wild horses, cave lions, and giant steppe bison.

After the discovery, Minister of Tourism and Culture Ranj Pillai said ”The Yukon has always been an internationally renowned leader for ice age and Beringia research. We are thrilled about this significant discovery of a mummified woolly mammoth calf: Nun cho ga.”

”Without strong partnerships between placer miners, Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin, and the Yukon government, discoveries like this could not happen,” Pillai added.

”This is as a remarkable recovery for our First Nation, and we look forward to collaborating with the Yukon government on the next steps in the process for moving forward with these remains in a way that honours our traditions, culture, and laws,” said Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Chief Roberta Joseph.

Woolly mammoths roamed North America, Asia, and Europe from about 300,000 years ago up until around 10,000 years ago, according to palaeontologists.

SOURCE : WION

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